New Energy Perspectives Podcasts

3S PhD student and researcher Elizabeth Errington has produced a brilliant new series of podcasts about energy, which will be of interest to energy researchers, policy-makers and practitioners alike. They cover a range of issues including justice, gender and behaviour change. This is was Liz has to say about the new series: “Affordable energy is…

Broadening public engagement with energy

3S researchers Jason Chilvers, Helen Pallett and Tom Hargreaves have today launched an important policy briefing calling for a new approach to public engagement with energy.   The UK Energy Research Centre briefing – entitled ‘Public engagement with energy: broadening evidence, policy and practice’ – translates findings from our Remaking Energy Participation project to policy-makers…

Scoping note: Rethinking energy participation as relational and systemic

On July 14th 2015 Jason Chilvers, Helen Pallett and Tom Hargreaves published a scoping note entitled ‘Rethinking energy participation as relational and systemic’. As part of a the Systemic participation and decision-making in UK energy transitions UK Energy Research Centre (UKERC) project the note develops new perspectives on energy participation and societal engagement with energy systems. It creates…

3S WP 2012-08 Bucio et al – Energy densities: why do they matter for sustainability?

Immoderate institutional focus on CO2 emissions tends to obscure the energy-density challenge implied by the low-carbon economy transition. Such an attention deficit is often apparent in the sustainability transitions literature in general and in the multi-level perspective (MLP) in particular. The latter characterises the comparatively “benign” conditions of industrial societies which, riding the upside of…

3S WP 2012-01 Hargreaves – Governing Energy Use at Home: Smart Meters, Governmentality and Resistance

This paper examines attempts to reduce household energy consumption through the introduction of real time display monitors (RTDs) that enable householders to ‘see’ their energy use (and its associated carbon emissions) and thus take steps to reduce it. Drawing on repeat semi-structured interviews, conducted 12-months apart, with 10 householders participating in a ‘Visible Energy Trial’…